The Big Idea

Dominican Republic | Economic slowdown

| July 21, 2023

This document is intended for institutional investors and is not subject to all of the independence and disclosure standards applicable to debt research reports prepared for retail investors.

The Dominican Republic’s central bank has announced its second straight rate cut as it tries to counter slowing growth, which could drop well below 4% this year. That pace would look like de facto recession by Dominican standards. A slowdown would also come ahead of elections next year. Slowdown should not jeopardize the country’s resilient ‘BB’ ratings, especially based on its track record of fiscal discipline and strong overall policy management. But it should provide stronger rationale for the relative value of local bonds and should support demand for any additional dual currency bond issuance.

There has been almost a whiplash at the central bank with a quick response to the collapse in the inflation data as well as the economic slowdown. Not only did the central bank cut their policy rate through May and June from 8.50% to 7.75%, but it also provided extraordinary liquidity to encourage a faster decline in bank lending rates. The preview to the May inflation data showed clear reversion back within the bank’s inflation band while the June data reaffirmed the 4% inflation target. The core inflation still remains above target through June at 5.3% year-over-year; however annualized monthly data at 0.2% to 0.4% for the past four months remains quite low. The post meeting communique explains the lower demand side inflationary pressures as well as the relief from lower global commodity prices.

There is also reference to the extraordinary liquidity injection to facilitate a faster transmission mechanism for a recovery in demand in the second half of 2023. The economy will have to show a quick rebound to the upside to reach above 3% GDP growth this year after only 1.5% year-over-year SA average growth from January to May 2023. The slowdown in the first quarter this year has been mostly concentrated in manufacturing, mining and construction with still resilient agriculture and service sectors (tourism). The central bank still expects a recovery to 4% GDP growth this year and reversion back to 5% trend GDP growth in 2024 on monetary stimulus, dynamic tourism, and greater public investment. The central bank survey expectations align with 4% GDP growth on median expectations in 2023 but are slightly lower at 3.86% on average expectations for June 2023.

The latent bias is for downside risk to growth and more aggressive monetary stimulus, especially if the Finance Ministry has minimal flexibility for any additional fiscal stimulus. The fiscal performance through May shows a slight deterioration reverting from a nominal surplus of 0.3% of GDP in 2022 to a deficit of 0.3% of GDP in 2023 (excluding the one-ff central bank transfer in February). The revenues remain resilient at a 10% year-over-year average increase (and 8% year-over-year VAT) through May; however, spending remains more robust at 12% year-over-year across most categories (excluding central bank transfer) except for private sector subsidies. This suggests underlying bias towards a fiscal deficit closer to 3.5% of GDP then the budgeted deficit of 3% of GDP. This may shift the burden for additional stimulus on the central bank. There is typical debate about the neutral policy rate with current levels at 3.75% not far from average 3.0% real rates pre Covid (2014-2019) but a slower than expected economic recovery that could encourage below-neutral policy rates.

This should reinforce the attractiveness of local rates, even after the impressive gains (12.5% to near 9.5% since February on DOP’33s). There has been renewed focus on local markets on a regional trend of FX appreciation and a peak of the monetary tightening cycles. The diversification has also been a defensive characteristic with the clear outperformance of the DOP’33 dual-currency bonds versus the USD’31s Eurobonds after multi-tranche launch in February 2023 and through broader market instability in March 2023. The recent pullback on foreign exchange weakness (unwinding most of February gains) should be only temporary if the central bank adopts a more aggressive rate cut cycle on renewed cross border inflows on local markets.

Siobhan Morden
siobhan.morden@santander.us
1 (212) 692-2539

This material is intended only for institutional investors and does not carry all of the independence and disclosure standards of retail debt research reports. In the preparation of this material, the author may have consulted or otherwise discussed the matters referenced herein with one or more of SCM’s trading desks, any of which may have accumulated or otherwise taken a position, long or short, in any of the financial instruments discussed in or related to this material. Further, SCM may act as a market maker or principal dealer and may have proprietary interests that differ or conflict with the recipient hereof, in connection with any financial instrument discussed in or related to this material.

This message, including any attachments or links contained herein, is subject to important disclaimers, conditions, and disclosures regarding Electronic Communications, which you can find at https://portfolio-strategy.apsec.com/sancap-disclaimers-and-disclosures.

Important Disclaimers

Copyright © 2024 Santander US Capital Markets LLC and its affiliates (“SCM”). All rights reserved. SCM is a member of FINRA and SIPC. This material is intended for limited distribution to institutions only and is not publicly available. Any unauthorized use or disclosure is prohibited.

In making this material available, SCM (i) is not providing any advice to the recipient, including, without limitation, any advice as to investment, legal, accounting, tax and financial matters, (ii) is not acting as an advisor or fiduciary in respect of the recipient, (iii) is not making any predictions or projections and (iv) intends that any recipient to which SCM has provided this material is an “institutional investor” (as defined under applicable law and regulation, including FINRA Rule 4512 and that this material will not be disseminated, in whole or part, to any third party by the recipient.

The author of this material is an economist, desk strategist or trader. In the preparation of this material, the author may have consulted or otherwise discussed the matters referenced herein with one or more of SCM’s trading desks, any of which may have accumulated or otherwise taken a position, long or short, in any of the financial instruments discussed in or related to this material. Further, SCM or any of its affiliates may act as a market maker or principal dealer and may have proprietary interests that differ or conflict with the recipient hereof, in connection with any financial instrument discussed in or related to this material.

This material (i) has been prepared for information purposes only and does not constitute a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any securities, related investments or other financial instruments, (ii) is neither research, a “research report” as commonly understood under the securities laws and regulations promulgated thereunder nor the product of a research department, (iii) or parts thereof may have been obtained from various sources, the reliability of which has not been verified and cannot be guaranteed by SCM, (iv) should not be reproduced or disclosed to any other person, without SCM’s prior consent and (v) is not intended for distribution in any jurisdiction in which its distribution would be prohibited.

In connection with this material, SCM (i) makes no representation or warranties as to the appropriateness or reliance for use in any transaction or as to the permissibility or legality of any financial instrument in any jurisdiction, (ii) believes the information in this material to be reliable, has not independently verified such information and makes no representation, express or implied, with regard to the accuracy or completeness of such information, (iii) accepts no responsibility or liability as to any reliance placed, or investment decision made, on the basis of such information by the recipient and (iv) does not undertake, and disclaims any duty to undertake, to update or to revise the information contained in this material.

Unless otherwise stated, the views, opinions, forecasts, valuations, or estimates contained in this material are those solely of the author, as of the date of publication of this material, and are subject to change without notice. The recipient of this material should make an independent evaluation of this information and make such other investigations as the recipient considers necessary (including obtaining independent financial advice), before transacting in any financial market or instrument discussed in or related to this material.

The Library

Search Articles